PENNSYLVANIA CORONAVIRUS: 87,242 cases of COVID-19


POLICE SAY THE VICTIM WAS IN HIS MID-20’S. THE STATE OF HEALTH HAS RELEASED THE LATEST CORONAVIRUS NUMBERS. IT ADDED 636 CASES FOR A TOTAL OF 87,242. THERE WERE 38 NEW DEATHS REPORTED FOR A TOTAL OF SIX TO 687 — OF 6687. IN THE SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY.

Coronavirus: 87,242 cases of COVID-19 in Pennsylvania

WGAL News 8 coronavirus updates

The Pennsylvania Department of Health says there are now 87,242 cases of coronavirus in the state. That is an increase of 636 from the previous day.The department also reported three new deaths for a total of 6,687 deaths.Map shows number of COVID-19 cases county-by-county“As nearly the entire state is now in the green phase, we must remain committed to protecting against COVID-19,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Pennsylvania has been a model for the country on how to reopen effectively using a careful, measured approach. However, the virus has not gone away. Each of us has a responsibility to continue to protect ourselves, our loved ones and others by wearing a mask, maintaining social distancing and washing our hands frequently. Together we can protect our most vulnerable Pennsylvanians, our essential workers and our healthcare system.”There are 689,562 patients who have tested negative to date. Coronavirus has been found in all of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties.Most of the patients hospitalized are aged 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. There have been no pediatric deaths to date.- You can see coronavirus cases broken down by zip code here.Susquehanna Valley new daily coronavirus cases:Adams County: 2Cumberland County: 4Dauphin County: 14Franklin County: 15Juniata County: 0Lancaster County: 22Lebanon County: 8Mifflin County: 0Perry County: 0York County: 16Susquehanna Valley total coronavirus cases county-by-county.Adams County: 341Cumberland County: 856Dauphin County: 2,059Franklin County: 940Juniata County: 111Lancaster County: 4,464Lebanon County: 1,350Mifflin County: 63Perry County: 86York County: 1,531Susquehanna Valley hospitals tracking casesSome local healthcare providers are posting hospital-specific coronavirus information on their websites.Use the links below to see the online dashboards for Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center and Lancaster General Hospital:PSU Hershey dashboardLGH dashboardCoronavirus – What you should knowThe following information is from the CDC:What are the signs and symptoms?The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.FeverCoughShortness of breathReported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.How does COVID-19 Spread?Person-to-person spreadThe virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.Can someone spread the virus without being sick?People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.Spread from contact with infected surfaces or objectsIt may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.How easily does coronavirus spread?The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas.How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (spread easily), like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily.Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, spreading continually without stopping.PreventionThere is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.Clean your hands oftenWash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.For information specific to healthcare, see CDC’s Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings.Avoid close contactAvoid close contact with people who are sickPut distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.Stay home if you’re sickStay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.Cover coughs and sneezesCover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.Throw used tissues in the trash.Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.Clean and disinfectClean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health says there are now 87,242 cases of coronavirus in the state. That is an increase of 636 from the previous day.

The department also reported three new deaths for a total of 6,687 deaths.

Map shows number of COVID-19 cases county-by-county

“As nearly the entire state is now in the green phase, we must remain committed to protecting against COVID-19,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Pennsylvania has been a model for the country on how to reopen effectively using a careful, measured approach. However, the virus has not gone away. Each of us has a responsibility to continue to protect ourselves, our loved ones and others by wearing a mask, maintaining social distancing and washing our hands frequently. Together we can protect our most vulnerable Pennsylvanians, our essential workers and our healthcare system.”

There are 689,562 patients who have tested negative to date. Coronavirus has been found in all of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties.

Most of the patients hospitalized are aged 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. There have been no pediatric deaths to date.

You can see coronavirus cases broken down by zip code here.

Susquehanna Valley new daily coronavirus cases:

  • Adams County: 2
  • Cumberland County: 4
  • Dauphin County: 14
  • Franklin County: 15
  • Juniata County: 0
  • Lancaster County: 22
  • Lebanon County: 8
  • Mifflin County: 0
  • Perry County: 0
  • York County: 16

Susquehanna Valley total coronavirus cases county-by-county.

  • Adams County: 341
  • Cumberland County: 856
  • Dauphin County: 2,059
  • Franklin County: 940
  • Juniata County: 111
  • Lancaster County: 4,464
  • Lebanon County: 1,350
  • Mifflin County: 63
  • Perry County: 86
  • York County: 1,531

Susquehanna Valley hospitals tracking cases

Some local healthcare providers are posting hospital-specific coronavirus information on their websites.

Use the links below to see the online dashboards for Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center and Lancaster General Hospital:

Coronavirus – What you should know

The following information is from the CDC:

What are the signs and symptoms?

The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

How does COVID-19 Spread?

Person-to-person spread

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Can someone spread the virus without being sick?

People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).

  • Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Spread from contact with infected surfaces or objects

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

How easily does coronavirus spread?

The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas.

How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (spread easily), like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily.

Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, spreading continually without stopping.

Prevention

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • For information specific to healthcare, see CDC’s Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings.

Avoid close contact

Stay home if you’re sick

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.



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